Six Years of Guantanamo Bay

Guantanamo Bay Prison is 6 years old today (see previous post). Here are photos of some of the people imprisoned there.

Adnan Farhan Abdul Fatif

Salim Hamdan

Mohamed el Gharani

David Hicks


Omar Khadr

Visit the Center for Constitutional Rights to send a letter to presidential candidates expressing your support for closing Guantanamo Bay Prison.

More on detainees

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~ by lolarusa on January 11, 2008.

3 Responses to “Six Years of Guantanamo Bay”

  1. Why do civilians consistently want to control military matters? Gitmo is a military base, not a civilian prison. Prisoners at Gitmo do not have rights, because they are prisoners. Prisoners only because by humanitarian reasons were not shot on site during war. They are prisoners instead of dead. I think that is more than fair.

    Lets also not forget, civilian prisoners do not have rights either. They are no longer law abiding citizens of the civilian population and all their rights of being such, have been removed as a result. Lets not confuse civilian prisons with military camps where prisoners were spared their life instead of shot on sight.

  2. Hello, again, Rocket. I haven’t had much luck in making you stick to the facts in your past comments, but for anyone else who might read this, here they are (again):

    A large majority of the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay were not arrested or captured during any kind of war or battle.

    86% of the prisoners held at Guantanamo were brought there by citizens of Afghanistan or Pakistan, most of whom were given monetary rewards for turning them over to U.S. forces. Only 5% were actually captured by U.S. forces.

    More than 400 detainees, or about 55%, have been determined not to have committed any acts of violence against the United States.

  3. Regardless, prisoners of war have rights too. There is no ambiguity in the Geneva Convention about what a prisoner of war is or how a prisoner of war should be treated.

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